Residential Colleges: More Than a Living Space

If you’re considering applying to Rice, you’ve probably heard about the residential college system. The residential colleges are interesting – they are a little bit of everything. Even now as a junior, I am realizing how much the diversity of socialization and experiences that the colleges provide play a prominent part of my undergraduate career.

At other universities, my friends describe their dorms as more distinct – as “humanities dorms” or “honors dorms” or “engineering dorms.” Rice’s residential colleges are more of a mix, with no one major or program dominating the spaces we live in. The residential colleges are an inclusive blend of everything – academic interests, social interests, cultures. Even for me, personally, living on campus at Wiess College for the past two and a half years has produced interactions and memories with different kinds of individuals. In my current suite, I live with an athlete, an artist, and a future chemical engineer. My freshman year, I shared a room with a Math major who stayed up with me every other night writing proofs while I wrote essays for my English courses. Sophomore year, my roommate and I (usually) both went to bed by midnight, juggling very different non-academic commitments and daily to-do lists, but still managing to attend social and campus-wide events together.

Rice’s residential college system can bring you close to very individually interesting, bright, and inspiring people – here’s my suite heading over to the fall formal, Esperanza, all together.

At any given time in the residential college commons, I often see groups of people working together. I also see people getting up and floating around, interacting with people who are working on something completely different (whether academically, or for another purpose – someone designing a shirt for a social event, for instance). The residential colleges really allow each and every one of us to bring our unique interests, talents, and experiences to the table. No matter where you live on campus, no matter which residential college’s cheers you learn during O-week, your residential college provides potential interactions and friendships with people of all kinds. And although each college has its own colors, traditions, and buildings, they each share one very important feature: they are inclusive of all academic majors, ages, cultural backgrounds, and voices.

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