Rice Owls, Then and Now

One of the RAs at my residential college works in the Research Center at Fondren Library. A few weeks ago, she gave me and a few other Sidizens a highlights tour of some of her favorite things in the library archives. While we were there, we got to see all kinds of treasures. These included:

  • A nurse’s uniform from World War I
  • A world map from the 1300s (although you would definitely get lost if you used it for directions)
  • Possible X-rays of Hitler’s skull
  • A book with a cover that may or may not have been made from human skin (spooky!)
  • The first folio of Shakespeare’s works

Getting to turn through the pages of books written hundreds of years before I was born made me feel like I was traveling back in time. I couldn’t believe that these treasures had only been a few floors below me while I worked on assignments at the library late into the night!

The first folio of Shakespeare’s works was compiled in 1623, almost 300 years before Rice was founded.

Of all of the things that I was able to see, however, I was particularly intrigued by the Rice-related items in the archive collection. Amidst the glimpses of the past on display were old yearbooks and photographs taken during the university’s early days. It’s amazing to see how much larger and how much more diverse our campus has become over the years. With the university’s founding in 1912, almost none of the buildings that I go into each day existed, and there were about the same number of people in my Econ class last semester as there were in the first graduating class.

Pictures from when Sid Rich first opened in 1971. The building was dedicated by LBJ!

As I went forward in time from the university’s founding, I saw class sizes grow, watched campus expand, and witnessed an increase in diversity on campus. Along the way, I got to see pictures of my own residential college, Sid Rich, from when it first opened in 1971. As the pictures moved from black and white to color, I watched hairstyles and fashion change. Different faces occupied the photographs taken year after year. However, throughout the tremendous growth and positive change that Rice has experienced, the unconventional wisdom of its student body has remained an integral part of the campus culture. Going through the archives that night made me realize that Rice has always been committed to educating its students so that they can change the world for the better. The Rice experience is truly life-changing, and there are so many opportunities waiting here for you to discover!

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