Houston Winter is Coming

There are many things that join the Rice students as one. Similar classes, parties, Coffeehouse, and residential colleges can give Rice students from around the world a common bond. These experiences all give a chance for students to bring their past experiences and share them with one another, creating bonds through differences. But one experience at Rice causes everyone to forget their past and uniformly struggle through together: Houston Winter.

At the time Houston Winter arrives, everyone has been at Rice for about 3 months. This means everyone is acclimated to the fact that we don’t ever have below 90% humidity and summer lasts through October. No matter where in the world students come from, air conditioning is now cold, and a good day is defined by when you can’t feel the sun burning your skin. Everyone is convinced that summer will never end, and so the cries roll in at the first sign of a chill in the air. And when students have something common to complain about, that is when everlasting bonds form.

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Houston Winter attire: Short sleeves and gloves or scarf (not both or you’ll sweat too much)

Houston Winter is defined in most other parts of the country as “fall”.” However, in Houston, winter is defined as any period of time where you prefer to be inside because air conditioning is now warmer than outside. This usually begins around the start of November, a confusing period of time because the outfits can no longer be planned based on how you feel when you wake up. You feel a brisk wind in the morning, and decide to break out that olive green sweater, only to find yourself trapped indoors after 10am because it is above 90 degrees and there is no sign of a single cloud.

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Rice Snow fight when it is 80 degrees and sunny

Snow in Houston is like the Loch Ness monster: there have been a few sightings, but relatively few people have actually encountered it. Luckily, Rice brings us snow! As a study break last year, Lovett College decided to have some shaved ice brought in so we could experience “a real winter.” And Houston Winter is the perfect transition to when everyone goes home to visit their families where they may be able to see real snow, and try to convince their friends that a magical place where fall lasts 6 months really does exist.

Beyond the Hedges

When I have free time at Rice, I try to go out and explore the city. Houston is the third largest city in the country and we have an unparalleled number of leisure activities to partake in. Here is my list of the top places to visit:

  • The Galleria: The Galleria has everything – stores range from basic shoe stores to the more unusual stores, such as a Tesla store complete with model cars. In addition to hundreds of stores, there are a variety of restaurants and even an ice skating rink (with rental skates available).
  • Wild West: If you aren’t from Texas, you may not be familiar with the dance form called “two-stepping.” Even if you are from Texas, and maybe even Houston, you may still have never heard of two-stepping. That’s okay. Two-stepping is easy to pick up and it’s really fun to go with friends. Most people go at night, usually during the week.
  • Edwards Greenway Grand Palace Stadium 24 & RPX: It’s the movie theater. I always enjoy taking in a good film once in a while, and this theater is conveniently located near Rice, has lots of show times, and comfortable seats.
  • The Fine Arts District (Downtown): Once in a while, Rice will have ticket giveaways and discounts to shows via Passport to Houston. I’ve been lucky enough to see an opera (Marriage of Figaro) and a symphony (Mahler Symphony No. 5). Other fun parts in Downtown include Discovery Green, a park filled with festivals almost every weekend.
  • Rice Village: The Rice Village is the nearest mall to Rice (a short walk, and the Rice bus has a weekend route to the Village as well). There are tons of restaurants and niche stores that are great to check out, especially a boba tea store (your newest favorite drink once you arrive at Rice).

This concludes my short list of places to visit; the majority of places are very close to Rice and are within the 610 loop. Next time you have a free evening or weekend, go out and see some of the best places that Houston has to offer!

Don’t Be Afraid to Go Outside of your Comfort Zone

Rice has a bunch of students that all come from different places— from neighboring towns in Houston to foreign countries across the globe. Nevertheless, we all amalgamate together on campus and bring special diversity to the undergraduate student population. In my case, I hail from the state of New Jersey, just a meager 1,607 miles away from Rice. Whenever I mention that I’m from New Jersey, people never hesitate to ask the token follow-up question: “So why did you decide to come to Rice and live in Texas?” As much as I understand why they ask me, over time I’ve realized that the question implies that most people don’t choose to attend a university far away from home without an explicitly good reason.

My token answer to the token question? I wanted to go to Rice because of the amazing community they have with the residential colleges, its proximity to the largest medical center in the world, and its unique social and cultural environment. Additionally, Houston is one of the most diverse cities in the country, with a myriad of great opportunities (academic and non-academic) for college and beyond. I feel like that answer very much justifies itself, but many people still ask me why I wanted to move so far away. Yes, I don’t get to see my friends and family as often, but I do not regret exploring and going out of my comfort zone in a new environment. From my perspective, I’ve had some of the most unique experiences living in Houston, whether that be cultural experiences from living in Texas to academic experiences from interning at special organizations here. I’m someone who can struggle with change, but lately I’ve become more open to saying yes to new things because they are usually the most rewarding. And going to Rice is a prime example of its benefits.

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Houston has so many cool attractions to visit with friends! This is Discovery Green, and they had a cool interactive exhibit this past March.

I’m not saying that it’s better to go farther away from home, but you shouldn’t limit your options. There are many factors to consider (like finances and family), but I think that I made the right choice going to school here. At Rice, I’ve been exposed to such a unique culture within the diverse campus and beyond. Even though Texas is a new environment for me, Rice makes me feel like I very much belong here. Besides, I’m not the only New Jerseyian or Northeasterner here. I’ve befriended many other students who come from the same area as me. There are still internship and job opportunities connected to Rice that are located throughout the country (including where I’m from), so my college experience is not limited to Houston.

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The MFA (Museum of Fine Arts) is super close to Rice. And the best part is that Rice students get in for free!

To any student who lives far away from Texas and is considering Rice: keep in mind that going beyond what you’re comfortable with can yield some of the most worthwhile experiences. And the best part about living far away from school? The trip back home is 100 times more special.

New Perspectives on War

Where can you see thought-provoking images of war with your friends, complete with a one-hour tour given by one of the curators? At the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

On Wednesday, I, along with several other members of McMurtry, my residential college, had this opportunity. One of our Resident Associates (a faculty member who lives at the residential college), had organized the event, and had gotten us discounted tickets.

The photographs were hauntingly beautiful. The curator explained how we often forget that there are people behind those images. These photographers risk their lives while not even being soldiers, while not even being in combat. They gamble with their lives to preserve pieces of history.

One of the images that stuck with me is simple at first glance. It shows some grass, dirt, and soldiers from two different angles. The curator explained that the photographer took the photos right after he had mistakenly stepped on a landmine.

This exhibit is running until February 3rd, but there are many interesting upcoming exhibits, including “The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia: A New Beginning,” “Princes and Paupers: The Art of Jacques Callot,” and “Picasso Black and White.”

A fantastic aspect of Rice is that thinking goes beyond the hedges. There are events like this that make it easy for students to look at the world with new vantage points.