Academic Realizations and Reflections, Junior Year Edition

I am a Psychology and English double major, which means I get to read and write – a lot. On a daily basis, my backpack is full of thick reading packets, several novels, and a hefty textbook or two. To some, this may sound like a nightmare. For me, reading is what I’m all about.

Double majors are pretty common at Rice. But before I got here, I thought that I would solely focus on Psychology as an academic major. “College is hard, how could I handle not just one but two sets of requirements and workloads??” This was my mindset in high school. Since then, I have learned some very important lessons about academics. Though this all comes from my own personal experience, I want to share a few valuable realizations I’ve come to during my past two and a half years at Rice:

  1. If you love what you’re doing, you’re learning in more ways than one. You’re not just completing major requirements – each and every class can teach you something about your passions, how you communicate, your work ethic, and your capabilities. When you enjoy reading lengthy articles, conducting research, or finally completing a challenging problem set, you’re not just checking things off of a to-do list, or storing information in your mind for a midterm. You learn a thing or two about yourself when you realize what kind of information jumps out at you in articles, where you have to stop and scratch your head while you’re writing out a proof, or how you contribute to a group project.
  2. No major is better/easier/harder than the other. This becomes pretty obvious when you spend time with friends who are majoring in vastly different things. Your passions as well as your work habits may not line up with theirs – but you’re not the only one working hard. Media articles “ranking” majors according to intelligence, average income, and popularity do not reflect reality; majoring in something is a personal experience. No two Psychology majors are the same. That goes without saying, but it’s important to remind ourselves, and to respect others. Thankfully, Rice has so many incredible, different people doing incredible, different things. And that is by no means defined by how “good/hard/challenging” their majors are – those are value judgments we need to save for the media (if not altogether get rid of).
  3. Taking advantage of the endless opportunities that a university like Rice offers can make the biggest impact on your life. A single email recruiting job applicants, sent on the Social Sciences mailing list during my freshman year, changed my life. I applied to an English immersion summer camp abroad, where I discovered (or perhaps rediscovered, in my case) my passion for teaching and working with young kids. I have worked there for two summers now, and I cannot even begin to express my gratitude for the self-discovery and the friendships it has offered me. Although I am still a junior, I am now hoping to teach English at primary or secondary schools after I graduate. I learned so much about myself from one single opportunity that Rice offered me; all it took was a single click on an email attachment.
My suitemates and I are vastly different people, with very different majors, doing very different things – but we are constantly supporting and encouraging each other’s’ endeavors. We are all enjoying our individual college experiences here at Rice.

My suitemates and I are vastly different people, with very different majors, doing very different things – but we are constantly supporting and encouraging each other’s endeavors here at Rice.

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