Research at Rice

Coming into Rice, I definitely knew I wanted to do research here. I remember going to research panels as a “prospie” (prospective student) during Owl Days and hearing about all the wonderful opportunities and ways to start research here. Personally, I really wanted to work off-campus at the Texas Medical Center because I wanted to work in a clinical environment as a premed. I remember continuing to attend other research panels once I started going to Rice. These panels often advertised research opportunities or discussed ways to getting involved. There are emails that you can subscribe to that publicize research opportunities and other programs that you can apply to as well. I find that emailing the principal investigator (PI) of a lab you’re interested in is the most effective and worthwhile way to get involved in research. If the PI is interested in speaking with you, then you usually meet up at their lab and discuss the next steps.

This is how I found my first research opportunity. I worked at a lab in the Neurological Research Institute (NRI) at the medical center. I investigated the effects of certain gene splicing errors on the behavioral, physiological, and neurological components of fruit flies. My lab was another community I found at Rice, and I had my own project to work on independently on my own time. As much as I enjoyed the experience, I realized that this type of research was not for me. I wanted to do more social sciences research and not so much work in a wet lab environment.

Rice is right next to the medical center, which makes it super convenient for students who want to work there.

A year later, I had a new opportunity to be involved in the Health, Humanism, and Society Scholars Program at Rice’s School of Social Sciences. This program allows students to work on medical humanities research at Texas Medical Center schools. I am still involved in this research now and it has been one of the most interesting and unique experiences I’ve had thus far at Rice. I am studying the moral, ethical, and legal implications of genomics at the Baylor College of Medicine’s Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy. A lot of the work I do is on my computer, coding interviews, writing up literature reviews, and researching case studies. I don’t have to go to the medical center as often, which makes it much more convenient for me. As I’m moving forward with my research, I’m excited (but also a bit nervous!) to present at the Rice Undergraduate Research Symposium this coming April. Not only has this research made me learn new skills and turned me into a more inquisitive and analytical student, but I’ve also realized what my academic interest are. In addition to wanting to go to medical school one day, I also want to go to grad school to study public health.

A lot of people, like me, don’t always stay with the same lab during their four years here. Sometimes it can take a while to find a lab that suits your interests and schedule. Regardless of what kind of research you do, it is a time commitment and you will get the most out of the experience if you put enough effort into it. For example, if you do research for credit, you usually need to put in 9-10 hours a week (equivalent to a 3-credit class at rice). Students can also get paid for their research, which can be extremely rewarding.

Research isn’t for everyone, but if you are slightly interested, I encourage you to try it out. It’s also important to note that at Rice you can do research in all sorts of subjects (sociology, engineering, science, history, etc), so don’t be discouraged to get involved just because you don’t think your major suits it. Just because you’re in a certain major does not mean you can’t do research in another subject area. The kind of research you want to do is super flexible, so I encourage you to take advantage of that. Research has developed me into a more well-rounded and mature individual who is more prepared to take on the real world.

Academic Realizations and Reflections, Junior Year Edition

I am a Psychology and English double major, which means I get to read and write – a lot. On a daily basis, my backpack is full of thick reading packets, several novels, and a hefty textbook or two. To some, this may sound like a nightmare. For me, reading is what I’m all about.

Double majors are pretty common at Rice. But before I got here, I thought that I would solely focus on Psychology as an academic major. “College is hard, how could I handle not just one but two sets of requirements and workloads??” This was my mindset in high school. Since then, I have learned some very important lessons about academics. Though this all comes from my own personal experience, I want to share a few valuable realizations I’ve come to during my past two and a half years at Rice:

  1. If you love what you’re doing, you’re learning in more ways than one. You’re not just completing major requirements – each and every class can teach you something about your passions, how you communicate, your work ethic, and your capabilities. When you enjoy reading lengthy articles, conducting research, or finally completing a challenging problem set, you’re not just checking things off of a to-do list, or storing information in your mind for a midterm. You learn a thing or two about yourself when you realize what kind of information jumps out at you in articles, where you have to stop and scratch your head while you’re writing out a proof, or how you contribute to a group project.
  2. No major is better/easier/harder than the other. This becomes pretty obvious when you spend time with friends who are majoring in vastly different things. Your passions as well as your work habits may not line up with theirs – but you’re not the only one working hard. Media articles “ranking” majors according to intelligence, average income, and popularity do not reflect reality; majoring in something is a personal experience. No two Psychology majors are the same. That goes without saying, but it’s important to remind ourselves, and to respect others. Thankfully, Rice has so many incredible, different people doing incredible, different things. And that is by no means defined by how “good/hard/challenging” their majors are – those are value judgments we need to save for the media (if not altogether get rid of).
  3. Taking advantage of the endless opportunities that a university like Rice offers can make the biggest impact on your life. A single email recruiting job applicants, sent on the Social Sciences mailing list during my freshman year, changed my life. I applied to an English immersion summer camp abroad, where I discovered (or perhaps rediscovered, in my case) my passion for teaching and working with young kids. I have worked there for two summers now, and I cannot even begin to express my gratitude for the self-discovery and the friendships it has offered me. Although I am still a junior, I am now hoping to teach English at primary or secondary schools after I graduate. I learned so much about myself from one single opportunity that Rice offered me; all it took was a single click on an email attachment.
My suitemates and I are vastly different people, with very different majors, doing very different things – but we are constantly supporting and encouraging each other’s’ endeavors. We are all enjoying our individual college experiences here at Rice.

My suitemates and I are vastly different people, with very different majors, doing very different things – but we are constantly supporting and encouraging each other’s endeavors here at Rice.

Rice, Round Two: Opportunities and Decisions, Dates, Deadlines

It’s the start of the second semester of my second year at Rice, and I already have several new things to consider: new classes, new professors, new opportunities. In addition, I have new responsibilities – namely, figuring out my academic plans and declaring my major(s). Thankfully, I took care of the latter task at the end of my freshman year, but there is still more to do. Now that I know what I’m majoring in, I have to start figuring out which classes to take and when, decide between various job and internship opportunities, and try to gain research experience in the fields of psychology that interest me the most. Sophomore year has been a treat to say the least, and I am continuously adapting to the varied aspects of the college experience.

It’s not all tedious tasks and distressing deadlines, though. Sophomore year has given me so many opportunities that I am thankful for. Two highlights include my role as a research assistant in one of Rice’s largest psychology labs, as well as my on-campus job. Continue reading

Rice in South Carolina!

I’ve had a whirlwind end of school year and summer!

At the end of the school year I participated in a fundraising event for an organization called St. Baldricks focused on raising money to support research towards the cure to children’s cancer. In order to raise money, I pledged to shaved my head on April 24th. Over the course of 3 weeks, I raised almost $2,000 and raised awareness for children’s cancer around Rice’s campus! The day of the shave ended up being a huge success and helped bring the Rice community together for a good cause.

A few weeks later, I flew down to Charleston, South Carolina for a summer research experience (Research Experience Undergraduates funded by the National Science Foundation – Minorities in Marine and Environmental Sciences) and had been having an amazing summer so far. Not only am I getting valuable research experience, learning how to structure and write my own research paper, but I am also getting to explore Charleston for the entire summer. While working here, I even had the great opportunity to meet a Rice Graduate School Alum working on my project with me. Dr. Dan Bearden got his Masters in 1983 and PhD in 1987 in Physics from Rice University and is now working here in the Hollings Marine Lab using nuclear magnetic resonance to discover metabolic trends in marine animals. We’ve been able to chat about all things Rice as well as marine and environmental sciences over the course of the summer

All in all, I’ve had some wonderful learning experiences this summer but I’m still very excited to get started back at Rice in the next couple of weeks!

Me in Winyah Bay, South Carolina holding a wild Red drum (my focal species for the summer)

Me in Winyah Bay, South Carolina holding a wild Red drum (my focal species for the summer)

Me and Dr. Dan Bearden, a Rice alum and current student

Me and Dr. Dan Bearden, a Rice alum and current student

My Summer in Japan

This is a guest post written by Lisa Chiba, a junior Chemical Engineering major who did research in Japan over the summer.

While watching everyone travel to foreign exotic countries to study abroad, you might be wondering, is there such a thing as an internship abroad?  My name is Lisa Chiba, and I am a rising junior chemical engineering major at Lovett. This summer, I was a participant of the NanoJapan Program, an undergraduate experience which takes 12 students from across the nation to Japan for a research internship for the summer. The application was lengthy but straightforward: 3 essays, and 2 recommendation letters. (Link to the site: http://nanojapan.rice.edu/.) I decided to apply because I wanted to have international work experience during my undergraduate years while also having a supportive team of US and Japanese researchers to help me through the transition to another country. Now that the program is over, I can wholeheartedly say that this has been a great opportunity to have an immersive study abroad experience with the application of nanotechnology/terahertz research in the top labs in Japan.

I was placed in the Kawata Lab in Osaka University under the guidance of a post-doc and a graduate student. My topic was tailored to my interests in biology by my host professor; I studied deep ultraviolet excitation of fluorescent proteins for multi-color cell imaging, which is a method that has never been done before. That’s right, you’re researching into something that no one has before… you get to make genuine progress on a project that has a chance to get published!

Attending the Shirahama Conference with my two labmates! (I'm in the center!)

Living and working in Japan was easily the best adventure of self-discovery I’ve ever had. I never thought I would be able to study abroad because of the cost, and I really wanted to spend my time productively gaining experience through an internship. NanoJapan is NSF-funded, so you get a stipend to cover your stay in Japan. It also places you in challenging projects with famed professors in the nanotechnology/terahertz world. Along with the research opportunity, you become so close to the other NanoJapan students from around the country, and your labmates in your respective university, that you don’t want to leave after spending 12 weeks in Japan. It’s an experience I will always remember, and with the professional network I developed, I may return to the Land of the Rising Sun another time in the future.

Global Urban Lab!

It's a bird...It's a plane...It's Global Urban Lab!

Recently, posters like the one above have been cropping up around campus. What exactly is Global Urban Lab, you might ask? It certainly is not the type of lab that comes to mind when one mentions ‘chem lab,’ but is instead one of the many study abroad opportunities available to students here at Rice. Rather than fusing chemicals, Global Urban Lab (GUL) seeks to ‘fuse’ major cities across the world in order to shed light on and to address the challenges facing them today. GUL participants do so by performing investigative research in their city of choice (London, Istanbul, Buenos Aires, or Shanghai) on their theme of choice (healthcare, sports, transportation, immigration, or development).  Research aside, the programs also include internships and transferable social science credit.

Continue reading