Food Trucks: The Hidden Gem of Rice University Public Dining

Last week, as I was browsing the Rice dining website, I stumbled upon the food trucks section. As a non-engineering major, I never wandered over by Mudd Labs or the OEDK (Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen), which is where the food trucks park from 5:30 PM until 9:00 PM.

Since I had never tried the food trucks, I challenged myself to eat at one everyday of the week (most likely at a detriment to my health). So, here’s where I ate:

Monday: Anna’s Gourmet Greek: I was daring and I ordered the chicken souvlaki. For those of you who have never had Greek food before, the chicken souvlaki is an excellent place to start. There are four to five pieces of chicken, topped with lettuce and tomatoes, and wrapped in pita bread. There’s also an indescribable sauce that coats the chicken. For the wallet-conscious, this item was on the higher end of food truck cuisine, costing $10.

Tuesday: Yummy Dog: I didn’t know what to expect from Tuesday night’s food truck offering. According to the dining website, I thought that both the Bonjour Creperie and the Yummy Dog would have trucks present. As it turns out, they alternate Tuesday nights, so only the Yummy Dog was there. TBH, I was feeling like crepes, especially on Crepe Day, but I decided to try something new: a “Texan” hotdog. Most of the time, I am a hotdog purist, meaning that I only eat the hotdog on a bun, sans condiments. Occasionally, I will put chili on top (is my Texan-ness showing?). The Texan hotdog was a beef hotdog on a pretzel bun, topped with jalapenos, onions, and barbecue sauce. In terms of pricing, this item was average, weighing in at about $8.

Wednesday: Bubba Burger: I was a bit rushed this night because I didn’t have a ton of time between my Law and Economics class and Dance Team practice, but I still ran over to the food trucks regardless. The food truck specialized in buffalo burgers, but I ordered a plain burger with lettuce and tomato only (this combination will forever be known as “The Hailey”). The 1/3-pound of beef on a bready bun with an excellent lettuce/tomato/meat ratio was stellar. My wallet smiled since this was the cheapest item from a food truck all week, priced at $5 (before tax).

Thursday: Foreign Policy: “American food with an International Flavor.” This food truck specialized in Korean, Mexican, Greek, and American cuisine. I decided to go with the Korean burger, even though it seemed spicy. This burger was huge – I could only eat about half before filling up. However, that could have been my fault, as I also had to get one of their stuffed donuts. There’s a complex process associated with making these donuts, but here’s the gist of it: They fry a tortilla and cover it in caramel and stick it between a sweet, succulent donut. This burger cost $9, in the middle in terms of pricing. The donut was $5 (probably the best food truck item I had all week – would strongly recommend!).

Friday: Off-campus dinner with my parents: I don’t have class on Friday this semester, so I usually don’t come on campus. I’ll probably try The Waffle Bus later, as the name “Waffle Bus” is impossible to pass up.

 

Overall, there are so many dining options on-campus, and even more off-campus. So far, I have been at Rice 3 semesters and still continue to discover new places to eat.

Are you ready for the food truck challenge?

UNIV 110: First Year Foundations

Wrapping up my freshman year at Rice, I can honestly say that one of the most influential classes I took was UNIV 110: First Year Foundations. As the name suggests, this class is geared towards helping new students navigate their first year (and beyond) at Rice. It exposes them to the many resources and opportunities available on campus. The instructor and the two upperclassmen Peer Guides give helpful advice on everything ranging from classes to off campus living.

Signing up for UNIV 110 was not only one of the best decisions of my Rice career, but one of the best decisions of my life. Through this class, I gained more than information about navigating Rice, on campus resources and opportunities, and helpful advice. I also gained another layer of community, strengthening existing friendships and forming new ones with people all across campus. The discussion-based format helped everyone understand each other’s perspectives, and helped everyone get to know each other. We have a strong group bond – for example, the Saturday before the first week of finals, we all reunited and went out to eat in Rice Village.

Additionally, I learned a lot about myself through this class. The reflective papers and projects allowed me to take a look at myself and the ways I’ve changed since first setting foot on this beautiful campus. Knowing yourself is the first step towards doing anything in life, and this class helped me accomplish that.

I highly, highly recommend this course to incoming students. It is a relatively stress free environment that allows for tons of identity and community building. If you have room in your schedule for UNIV 110, sign up for it. You won’t regret it.

Owls, Owls Everywhere! ASB San Francisco

Being a Rice Owl can take you to some exciting places. This Spring Break, instead of staying at home in Houston, I traveled to San Francisco, California on an Alternative Spring Break Trip to focus on the education gap in our nation.

What is an Alternative Spring Break trip? It’s exactly what the name suggests. No misnomer here! It is a service trip sponsored by Rice’s Community Involvement Center that you have to apply to. If chosen, you and the other members of your group go volunteer with the specified organization. There are several ASB trips each year, with various destinations and organizations. You can view a list of the 2012 trips at this link, under “2013 Trip Destinations”: http://cic.rice.edu/asb/#Student Information Sessions.

In San Francisco, I was paired with a teacher at a middle school. During the school day, I observed and helped out in the classroom, and afterwards, I volunteered at the built-in after school program. Not only did I get to help the kids, but I also got to learn about them, play games with them, and talk to them. I now understand the current state of our public education system better, and I learned that educational inequality involves many complex features. There isn’t an easy solution for educational inequality, but little things, such as telling a kid about your experiences in college, can potentially make a difference.

In addition to volunteering, my ASB group and I also got to tour around San Francisco. Some of the places we went to included Ghirardelli Square (I had the BEST ice cream cone in my LIFE), Fisherman’s Wharf, Coit Tower, and Baker Beach.

I mentioned how being a Rice Owl can take you to some exciting places. My group and I stayed in San Francisco for only a week. But, one night, as we were headed back on the bus to the place we were staying at, we met a Rice alumnus! One of my friends had been wearing a Rice hoodie, and the alumnus noticed it and started talking to our group. He had graduated a few years ago, and told us he now works in San Francisco. Owls, Owls, everywhere!

In short, my ASB experience was amazing, and I would not trade it for anything in the world.

Here we are at Baker Beach. Some of us made an ASB SF light show with our phones! Photo Credit: Soorya Avali.